McDonald's Pushes Movie To Schools That Shows McDonald's As Weight-Loss Tool.



“Everything in moderation,” is a fine mantra to adhere to. After all, observing the age-old adage can permit people to have a little of what they fancy once in a while and a treat breaks the mundane monotony of every day life. 


However, when a bastion of such treats, known for being unhealthy, claims the opposite, declaring to be a dieting beacon, moderation has definitely gone out of the window!




McDonald’s are having a bit of a lull recently, sales dips are worse than cold, soggy fries. Their reaction to this? A documentary by Iowa high-school science teacher, John Cisna, titled: “540 Meals: Choices Make the Difference.” As a kind of not-so-veiled retort to Morgan Spurlock’s “Supersize Me,” Cisna mirrored Spurlock’s motives of eating Supersize whenever he ate in McDonald’s everyday for a month – a move that caused a plethora of health problems including weight gain, cholesterol and mood swings.






Cisna ate 2,000 calories a day whilst sampling every item on the McDonald’s menu, even desserts, claiming to have lost 56 pounds. Cisna is now a “Brand Ambassador” for McDonald’s and visits high-schools extolling the virtues of McDonald’s new drive to encourage diners to make varied and informed choices. Of course there are vocal critics of the 20-minute documentary. Betina Elias Siegel on her blog, The Lunch Tray, being the most vocal. As an advocate of healthy eating for children, she lambasted the documentary as being a “veritable infomercial for the beleaguered fast food chain.” McDonald’s meanwhile defends promoting Cisna’s documentary, whilst disavowing themselves in being involved in production. A spokesperson said it was an: “original experiment conducted independent of McDonald’s, and McDonald’s Corp.



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Source:

https://www.minds.com